I just had my first big anxiety attack yesterday. It happened probably because of some friend drama and school responsibilities and how the world is completely crumbling down and I can’t do anything about it. I started sobbing uncontrollably, I was hyperventilating so oxygen couldn’t get to my hands so they started going numb I was alone for about 30 minutes until I had the strength to call my mom. I think what triggered it most was the drama which sounds kinda selfish. My friend always talks about herself and this guy she likes, I also messed up on this project and she told me off and looked disappointed, like I was stupid or something. We are best friends i know it’s just a phase but it’s hurting me.
i had my first anxiety on 2017 when i was in the last year in my high school and it lasted a year. the first symptoms i had was less sleep and when i sleep then wake up i would feel like i never had a sleep, another symptom was i had a racing heart beat that when i hear my pulse i would ask my self a lot of questions which would make me panic and make my pulse more faster. for that year i had the anxiety, i had reached a very high level in the anxiety like i used to talk to myself and ask what is happening to me, i used to google my symptoms and google would respond like i had a non-functioning glands and felt hopeless and would be like this forever. i used to cry a lot, but i had this part that made me feel better which was PRAYING. i started praying my 5 prayers everyday and reading Quran. After 2days i would sleep better, my pulse went back to normal and the most thing i missed a lot happiness. Afterwards i learnt how to control my anxiety and stress and whenever i feel some pressure i would do a pro-longed sujood and pray. the reason why posted this was i really feel you guys and when i read your posts, i saw myself in 2017 when i was hopeless so i wanted to tell you guys not to worry and you gonna have your life back and will be happy Insha Allah. just be connected to Allah
Panic attacks are generally brief, lasting less than 10 minutes, although some of the symptoms may persist for a longer time. People who have had one panic attack are at greater risk for having subsequent panic attacks than those who have never experienced a panic attack. When the attacks occur repeatedly, and there is worry about having more episodes, a person is considered to have a condition known as panic disorder.
While the use of drugs in treating panic attacks can be very successful, it is generally recommended that people also be in some form of therapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy. Drug treatments are usually used throughout the duration of panic attack symptoms, and discontinued after the patient has been free of symptoms for at least six months. It is usually safest to withdraw from these drugs gradually while undergoing therapy.[14] While drug treatment seems promising for children and adolescents, they are at an increased risk of suicide while taking these medications and their well-being should be monitored closely.[59]
Anxiety disorders are associated with chronic life stress. Unpredictable, unrelenting, unresolvable stressors chronically stimulate the stress hormone system and cardiovascular system, and lead to states of constant increased activity. Biologically, the body has evolved to deal with imminent and concrete danger in the environment, rather than continuous stressors. Under normal conditions where chronic stress is low, exposure to a sudden threat activates the autonomic nervous system, i.e. increased levels of adrenaline and faster breathing, and racing heart rate. These reactions in turn trigger activation of stress hormones, such as cortisol. One of the effects of these stress hormones is to increase glucose levels in the bloodstream in order to respond to the imminent threat, so that muscles can be activated for the flight or fight response. Another effect of stress hormones is to supress the immune system, since processes such as healing and repair can wait until after the threat subsides. However, in someone with an anxiety disorder, where there is constant activation of these responses to everyday stressors, the stress hormone system loses its ability to control immune function, thus contributing to heightened systemic inflammation that increases risk for cardiovascular and even autoimmune disorders. Neuroscience and clinical research continues to investigate how anxiety disorders increase individual risk for developing physical health co-morbidities in hopes of identifying new treatments that may alleviate suffering from and prevent the development of these whole-body disorders.
Panic Disorder, and other mental disorders, should only be diagnosed by a medical doctor, clinical psychologist, or other trained health provider who has spent time with the teenager and has conducted a proper mental health assessment. Diagnoses are complicated with many nuances. Please do not attempt to diagnose someone based on the symptoms you read in magazines or on the internet. If you are concerned, speak to a trained health professional.
Panic attacks are common among all anxiety disorders but what sets panic disorder apart is that panic attacks are unexpected and occur "out of the blue" without an obvious trigger (American Psychiatric Association, 2013; Craske & Barlow, 2007). These unexpected panic attacks must be associated with a significant change in behavior or be followed by at least one month of persistent worry about having another attack or about what will happen if you have another panic attack.
While the term "test anxiety" refers specifically to students,[33] many workers share the same experience with regard to their career or profession. The fear of failing at a task and being negatively evaluated for failure can have a similarly negative effect on the adult.[34] Management of test anxiety focuses on achieving relaxation and developing mechanisms to manage anxiety.[33]
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i had my first anxiety on 2017 when i was in the last year in my high school and it lasted a year. the first symptoms i had was less sleep and when i sleep then wake up i would feel like i never had a sleep, another symptom was i had a racing heart beat that when i hear my pulse i would ask my self a lot of questions which would make me panic and make my pulse more faster. for that year i had the anxiety, i had reached a very high level in the anxiety like i used to talk to myself and ask what is happening to me, i used to google my symptoms and google would respond like i had a non-functioning glands and felt hopeless and would be like this forever. i used to cry a lot, but i had this part that made me feel better which was PRAYING. i started praying my 5 prayers everyday and reading Quran. After 2days i would sleep better, my pulse went back to normal and the most thing i missed a lot happiness. Afterwards i learnt how to control my anxiety and stress and whenever i feel some pressure i would do a pro-longed sujood and pray. the reason why posted this was i really feel you guys and when i read your posts, i saw myself in 2017 when i was hopeless so i wanted to tell you guys not to worry and you gonna have your life back and will be happy Insha Allah. just be connected to Allah
If you are greatly afraid, however, such as being terrified that there is a burglar in your home that is about to harm you, the body produces a high degree stress response. We generally experience high degree stress responses as being anxiety attacks: where the changes are so profound they get our full attention. The greater the degree of anxiety and stress response, the more changes the body experiences.
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